BIO

C. Rosalind Bell is from Lake Charles, Louisiana.  Her parents, Clarence and Geneva, were both teachers.  She graduated from Southern University in Baton Rouge, where she majored in political science and thought about becoming an attorney.  She moved to Washington, D.C., in 1979 and was hired as a civil rights investigator by the Treasury Department.  Assigned to the department's West Coast division, Bell was sent to Seattle for a year, where she first glimpsed Pacific Northwest Greenery; she later ended up relocated to Tacoma, about an hour south of Seattle, and lives there now in a neighborhood known as the North End.

Rosalind Bell is the 2010 Dollover Artist in Residence at University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington.  She is the author of three plays, 1620 BANK STREET, UNDER THE CIRCUMSTANCES and THE NEW ORLEANS MONOLOGUES, which was developed and produced at University of Puget Sound in  2007.   Bell was awarded a City of Tacoma Arts Grant in 2009 and received a 2010 commission from Northwest Playwrights Alliance. One of her short stories, FIRST FRIEND, was adapted into the short film, TOOTIE PIE, and was screened at THE SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL and shown on PBS' KCTS in Spring 2010.  Her play, THE NEW ORLEANS MONOLOGUES, named a Top Ten Entertainment by The Tacoma News Tribune, had simultaneous November 2010 productions at City College San Franciso and UC Santa Cruz's Rainbow Theatre.


One of Rosalind's screenplays, Le Cirque Noir, about the rise and fall of the Duvaliers of Haiti, received a staged reading at the 2008 Downtown Los Angeles Film Festival. An excerpt of her novel-in-progress, LOVE, ME was featured in the magazine, City Arts Tacoma, May 2008. She is a director of the August Wilson Play Reading Series produced by Northwest Playwrights Alliance/Broadway Center/Washington State History Museum/The Conversation.  COLORLINES, the national news magazine on race and politics, featured Rosalind among its INNOVATORS FOR 2008. She is a member of Macondo, a Writers Workshop conceived by author Sandra Cisneros in San Antonio, and is also a member of The Conversation and The Black Collective.



Rosalind has also taught poetry to fourth graders at the African American Academy, a Seattle public school, as part of Seattle Arts & Lectures' Writers in the Schools program.  She hosts "Good Eating with Ros," a TV show on Comcast that highlights her collection of recipes and a deep love for cooking and gardening

A former professor at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, WA, Rosalind says, “By nature teaching is a creative process. Teaching students to critically think and think outside the box involves teaching them to tap into their creativity. I ask students to create visual representations of their thinking, design graphics to represent their thought processes, synthesize ideas in poetry, read dramatically to emphasize meaning and many other forms of creative expression.”

PHOTOGRAPHS OF VARIOUS "NEW ORLEANS MONOLOGUES" PRODUCTIONS

UC SANTA CRUZ CAST

University of Puget Sound Production (photo (c) Kurt Walls)

Actor Grace Livingston; University of Puget Sound Production (photo (c) Kurt Walls)

University of Puget Sound Production (photo (c) Kurt Walls)

University of Puget Sound Production (photo (c) Kurt Walls)

Actor Grace Livingstone; University of Puget Sound Production (photo (c) Kurt Walls)

University of Puget Sound Production (photo (c) Kurt Walls)

University of Puget Sound Production (photo (c) Kurt Walls)